Next webinar - Antenatal - Register here
Cord Blood & Tissue Banking Photo
Breastfeeding Icon

Cord Blood & Tissue Banking

Most asked questions

What is cord blood?

Cord blood is the blood that remains in a baby's umbilical cord and placenta immediately after the baby is born and the umbilical cord has been clamped and cut.

Your baby's cord blood contains a diverse mixture of important cells, including stem cells. Cord blood is a particularly rich source of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the ability to create and heal our organs, blood and the immune system. Because of their youth stem cells from umbilical cord blood are among the most flexible and potent in the body.

You only have  more answers you can read today! Sign-up for free and get unlimited access.

More questions

What is cord tissue?

Cord tissue contains blood vessels supported by tissue called Wharton’s jelly, which is a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The surrounding tissue is also a rich source of other cell types, e.g., endothelial cells, which have different potential uses. MSCs collected from cord tissue are multi-potent, meaning they have the ability to regenerate and differentiate into many different types of cells including cartilage, bone, fat and muscle. This important characteristic means that they could potentially be used to treat more conditions than cord blood alone can treat.

You only have  more answers you can read today! Sign-up for free and get unlimited access.
Why should I store my baby's stem cells?

Cord blood stem cells are more potent than adult stem cells and haven’t had exposure to environmental pollutants, viruses and chemicals that happen over time. There is greater flexibility in genetic matching where only a partial match between the donor and patient may be required. There is also a reduced risk of graft vs host disease and lower incidence of viral transmissions.

You only have  more answers you can read today! Sign-up for free and get unlimited access.
What is cord blood used for?

Worldwide, cord blood has been used in over 40,000 transplants in the treatment of over 80 conditions. In Australia, over 500 cord blood units have been released to treat many conditions here and abroad. It is used for blood cancers, metabolic disorders and immune disorders. These include conditions such as Sickle cell disease, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and aplastic anaemia.

You only have  more answers you can read today! Sign-up for free and get unlimited access.
Who can use my baby's cord blood?

Your baby’s umbilical cord stem cells are a perfect match for your child, and are more likely to be a match for siblings. The closer the match, the greater the likelihood of the body accepting the cells.

You only have  more answers you can read today! Sign-up for free and get unlimited access.
Can I delay the clamping of the cord and collect cord blood?

A number of Cell Care customers elect to delay clamping of the cord for 30 to 60 seconds prior to collection of their cord blood.

In the first 60 seconds after birth, up to 80% of blood volume is transferred from the placenta to the baby*. This means that up to 60 seconds of delayed cord clamping allows for your baby to receive the majority of cord blood at birth and still achieve sufficient cord blood for long term banking.

Delayed cord clamping does not affect the collection of cord tissue. This is something to consider when selecting your storage options. Over 60% of Cell Care clients elect to store both cord blood and tissue for their differing cell types and therapeutic applications.

You only have  more answers you can read today! Sign-up for free and get unlimited access.

Upcoming Webinar Classes

None